This day is to celebrate all the Trans people in our lives and community!

March 31st marks the annual Transgender Day of Visibility, an international holiday that celebrates transgender and gender non-conforming individuals. The day is dedicated to acknowledging all that has been accomplished to promote trans equality and justice in the face of adversity. It is also a time to raise awareness around the discrimination that unfortunately still exists.

Visibility Makes a Difference

While progress has been made, transgender and gender non-conforming individuals continue to face severe discrimination and systemic inequality, especially right here in South Carolina. This can be and has been attributed to a lack of understanding. Many people don’t know the journey of transgender youth and adults and the barriers that society presents. In fact, a public opinion survey found that only 30% of participants knew someone who is transgender, a statistic that continues to be part of ongoing conversations around why visibility is so important.

Knowing someone who identifies as transgender is associated with elevated support for transgender people and their rights. A growing research base suggests that information sharing, such as having a simple conversation, can reduce transphobia. And a study conducted by the Williams Institute in 2018 found that viewing images of transgender and gender non-conforming people can increase support for trans equality, again underscoring the significance of representation.

Why does this matter? In short – being visible (and vocal) is a catalyst for change. And we need change!

Visibility is a powerful tool in shattering stigma and altering perceptions. When transgender youth and adults share their stories, it demystifies the “unknown.” Increased awareness fosters affirmation, acceptance, and inclusion. This is why we need statewide policies and laws that not only allow but encourage all of members of the transgender community to feel physically and emotionally safe to live their lives openly and authentically.

The Current South Carolina Landscape

Sadly, South Carolina is taking steps in the opposite (and wrong) direction as two bills attacking transgender youth have recently been introduced in the South Carolina legislature.

H.4716 – YOUTH GENDER REASSIGNMENT PREVENTION ACT
TO AMEND THE CODE OF LAWS OF SOUTH CAROLINA, 1976, TO ENACT THE “YOUTH GENDER REASSIGNMENT PREVENTION ACT” BY ADDING CHAPTER 139 TO TITLE 44 SO AS TO PROHIBIT A PERSON WHO IS UNDER EIGHTEEN YEARS OF AGE FROM UNDERGOING GENDER REASSIGNMENT MEDICAL TREATMENT, TO PROVIDE FOR PROFESSIONAL DISCIPLINE FOR VIOLATION OF THE ACT, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES.

S.1087 – Interscholastic Activities Bill
TO AMEND SECTION 59-39-160 OF THE 1976 CODE, RELATING TO THE REQUIREMENTS FOR PARTICIPATION IN INTERSCHOLASTIC ACTIVITIES, TO PROVIDE THAT A STUDENT’S BIOLOGICAL SEX SHALL BE CONCLUSIVE IN A DETERMINATION CONCERNING WHETHER THE STUDENT MAY PARTICIPATE ON A TEAM COMPETING IN AN INTERSCHOLASTIC ACTIVITY THAT IS UNDER THE JURISDICTION OF THE SOUTH CAROLINA HIGH SCHOOL LEAGUE.

There can be fear in the unfamiliar, and that sentiment is exactly what these bills aim to exploit. South Carolina lawmakers leading the charge are encouraging discrimination and spreading misinformation. It’s irresponsible, ill-conceived, and detrimental to transgender youth and their families. The introduction of these bills, and the message that they send, demonstrates the need for greater visibility and education on the science, behind these bills is crucial in promoting affirmation and acceptance of youth.

Show Support!

Transgender youth and adults deserve equality now. They aren’t a statistic; they are your classmates, neighbors, coworkers, and family members. The best way to show your support and raise awareness for the transgender community is by taking action.

This day is to celebrate all the Trans people in our lives and community!

March 31st marks the annual Transgender Day of Visibility, an international holiday that celebrates transgender and gender non-conforming individuals. The day is dedicated to acknowledging all that has been accomplished to promote trans equality and justice in the face of adversity. It is also a time to raise awareness around the discrimination that unfortunately still exists.

Visibility Makes a Difference

While progress has been made, transgender and gender non-conforming individuals continue to face severe discrimination and systemic inequality, especially right here in South Carolina. This can be and has been attributed to a lack of understanding. Many people don’t know the journey of transgender youth and adults and the barriers that society presents. In fact, a public opinion survey found that only 30% of participants knew someone who is transgender, a statistic that continues to be part of ongoing conversations around why visibility is so important.

Knowing someone who identifies as transgender is associated with elevated support for transgender people and their rights. A growing research base suggests that information sharing, such as having a simple conversation, can reduce transphobia. And a study conducted by the Williams Institute in 2018 found that viewing images of transgender and gender non-conforming people can increase support for trans equality, again underscoring the significance of representation.

Why does this matter? In short – being visible (and vocal) is a catalyst for change. And we need change!

Visibility is a powerful tool in shattering stigma and altering perceptions. When transgender youth and adults share their stories, it demystifies the “unknown.” Increased awareness fosters affirmation, acceptance, and inclusion. This is why we need statewide policies and laws that not only allow but encourage all of members of the transgender community to feel physically and emotionally safe to live their lives openly and authentically.

The Current South Carolina Landscape

Sadly, South Carolina is taking steps in the opposite (and wrong) direction as two bills attacking transgender youth have recently been introduced in the South Carolina legislature.

H.4716 – YOUTH GENDER REASSIGNMENT PREVENTION ACT
TO AMEND THE CODE OF LAWS OF SOUTH CAROLINA, 1976, TO ENACT THE “YOUTH GENDER REASSIGNMENT PREVENTION ACT” BY ADDING CHAPTER 139 TO TITLE 44 SO AS TO PROHIBIT A PERSON WHO IS UNDER EIGHTEEN YEARS OF AGE FROM UNDERGOING GENDER REASSIGNMENT MEDICAL TREATMENT, TO PROVIDE FOR PROFESSIONAL DISCIPLINE FOR VIOLATION OF THE ACT, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES.

S.1087 – Interscholastic Activities Bill
TO AMEND SECTION 59-39-160 OF THE 1976 CODE, RELATING TO THE REQUIREMENTS FOR PARTICIPATION IN INTERSCHOLASTIC ACTIVITIES, TO PROVIDE THAT A STUDENT’S BIOLOGICAL SEX SHALL BE CONCLUSIVE IN A DETERMINATION CONCERNING WHETHER THE STUDENT MAY PARTICIPATE ON A TEAM COMPETING IN AN INTERSCHOLASTIC ACTIVITY THAT IS UNDER THE JURISDICTION OF THE SOUTH CAROLINA HIGH SCHOOL LEAGUE.

There can be fear in the unfamiliar, and that sentiment is exactly what these bills aim to exploit. South Carolina lawmakers leading the charge are encouraging discrimination and spreading misinformation. It’s irresponsible, ill-conceived, and detrimental to transgender youth and their families. The introduction of these bills, and the message that they send, demonstrates the need for greater visibility and education on the science, behind these bills is crucial in promoting affirmation and acceptance of youth.

Show Support!

Transgender youth and adults deserve equality now. They aren’t a statistic; they are your classmates, neighbors, coworkers, and family members. The best way to show your support and raise awareness for the transgender community is by taking action.

Donate to SC Equality TODAY!

Make your contribution today and join a grassroots force of supporters standing together for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer equality.

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